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(Flight or Hotel | Excursions | Rent a Car)

 

The Grand Palace

Within the palace complex are several impressive buildings including Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), which contains the small, very famous and greatly revered Emerald Buddha that dates back to the 14th century. The robes on the Buddha are changed with the seasons by HM The King of Thailand, and forms an important ritual in the Buddhist calendar. Thai Kings stopped living in the palace around the turn of the twentieth century, but the palace complex is still used to mark all kinds of other ceremonial and auspicious happenings.

Wat Suthat

Wat Suthat Thepphawararam is a Buddhist temple in Bangkok, Thailand. It is a royal temple of the first grade, one of ten such temples in Bangkok (23 in Thailand). Construction was begun by King Rama I in 2350 BE (1807 CE). Further construction and decorations were carried out by King Rama II who helped carve the wooden doors, but the temple was not completed until the reign of King Rama III in 2390 BE (1847–1848 CE). This temple contains the Buddha image Phra Sri Sakyamuni which have been moved from Sukhothai Province. At the lower terrace of the base, there are 28 Chinese pagodas which symbolize the 28 Buddhas born on this earth. In 2005 CE, the temple was submitted to UNESCO for consideration as a future World Heritage Site.

Giant Swing

The Giant Swing is a religious structure in Phra Nakhon, Bangkok, Thailand. Located in front of Wat Suthat, it was formerly used in an old Brahmin ceremony, and is one of Bangkok’s tourist attractions. You can go to Giant Swing by bus number 12, 35, 42, and 508.

The Bangkok National Museum
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The Bangkok National Museum is the main branch museum of the National Museums in Thailand and also one of the largest museum in Southeast asia features exhibits of Thai art and history. The museum is located in 4 Na Phra That, Bangkok 10200, Thailand, occupying the former palace of the vice king (or Front Palace), set between Thammasat University, and the National Theater, facing Sanam Luang.

The museum was established and opened in 1874 by King Rama V to exhibit relics from the rule of King Rama IV’s rule. Today the galleries contain exhibits covering Thai History back to Neolithic times. The collection includes The King Ram Khamhaeng Inscription, which was inscribed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Programme registered in 2003 in recognition of its world significance.

Other than preserving and displaying Thai artifacts dated from Dvaravati, Srivijaya, to Sukhothai and Ayutthaya period, the museum also displaying extensive collections of regional Asian Buddhist Arts such as Indian Gandhara, Chinese Tang, Vietnamese Cham, Indonesian Java, and Cambodian Khmer arts.

Chatuchak Weekend Market

The Chatuchak Weekend Market on Kamphaeng Phet 2 Road, Chatuchak, Bangkok, is the largest market in Thailand.Also known as JJ Market, it has more than 15,000 stalls, divided into 27 sections. Chatuchak Market sells many different kinds of goods, including plants, antiques, consumer electronics, cosmetics, pets, food and drinks, fresh and dry food, ceramics, furniture and home accessories, clothing, and books.

It is the world’s largest and most diverse weekend market, with over 200,000 – 300,000 visitors on a daily basis.

Lumpini Park

Lumphini Park is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for morning and evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

Tha Kha Floating Market

Not far from Amphawa (only 10km) is the smaller and far less touristy floating market of Tha Kha.

There are a good number of floating vendors here and the atmosphere is more tranquil than the bigger market at Amphawa. Although the choice of products to buy here is decidedly more limited, it’s still possible to eat well and more cheaply than at Amphawa. What’s more, a visit here feels like you’re sampling truly authentic Thai rural living.

What’s more, a visit here feels like you’re sampling truly authentic Thai rural living. This is a local experience and one you’re not likely to forget too quickly.

A ride on a rowboat here is a blissful experience through winding little waterways dripping with exotic overhead foliage. If you’re there in the middle of the day when the sun is bearing down overhead, you’ll probably want to buy one of the traditional hats that the women operating the boat stalls wear to shade you!

Khao San Road

Khaosan Road or Khao San Road is a short (410 meter long) street in central Bangkok, Thailand constructed in 1892 during the reign of Rama V. It is in the Bang Lamphu area of Phra Nakhon District about 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) north of the Grand Palace and Wat Phra Kaew.

Chinatown

Bangkok’s Chinatown is one of the largest Chinatowns in the world. It was founded in 1782 when the city was established as the capital of the Rattanakosin Kingdom, and served as the home of the mainly Teochew immigrant Chinese population, who soon became the city’s dominant ethnic group. Originally centred around Sampheng, the core of Chinatown now lies along Yaowarat Road, which serves as its main artery and sometimes lends its name to the entire area, which is often referred to as Yaowarat. Chinatown’s entire area is roughly coterminous with Samphanthawong District, and includes neighbourhoods such as Song Wat and Talat Noi along the Chao Phraya River, and Charoen Chai, Khlong Thom and Nakhon Khasem along Charoen Krung Road.

Originally a wilderness area outside the city walls, Chinatown grew to become Bangkok’s commercial hub throughout the late 19th to early 20th centuries, but has since declined in prominence as commercial activity moved elsewhere following the city’s expansion. It now serves as a hub of Chinese culture, with numerous shops selling traditional goods, and is especially known as a gastronomic destination.

Safari World and Marine Park

Safari World is a tourist attraction in Bangkok, Thailand that consists of two parks named Marine Park and Safari Park, operated by Safari World Public Limited. The park was opened in 1988 with a total area of 480 acres (190 ha) for its open zoo and 180 acres (73 ha) for its bird park. A major renovation to enhance effectiveness of land use began on 17 April 1989 and its total area developed for the leisure park now consists of an open zoo and a marine park on 500 rai (approximately 200 acres) of land.

On 1 February 1994, Safari World changed its name to Safari World Public Company Limited. Later, it was accepted by the Stock Exchange of Thailand (SET) to become the first and only entertainment park to be listed on SET on 16 February 1995.

Dinosaur Planet

Beyond Entertainment “Dinosaur Planet” Beyond Nova in a heart of Bangkok . It is complete edutainment center in ASEAN. Perfect for all the family members. “Dinosaur Planet” will take you back in times to the ancient world of dinosaurs, where they’re come back to live. Visitors can experience various types of dinosaurs and enjoy exciting presentation techniques, memorable activities, and world-class performances.

SEA Life Bangkok Ocean World

Sea Life Bangkok Ocean World (formerly, Siam Ocean World) is an aquarium in Bangkok, Thailand, the largest in South East Asia. It covers approximately 10,000 square meters (110,000 sq ft) with hundreds of different species on display in exhibits totaling about 5,000,000 liters (1,300,000 U.S. gal).

The Sea Life Bangkok Ocean World Bangkok aims to provide both entertainment and education to visitors. Through formal educational programs, the aquarium aims to promote an appreciation and understanding of the aquatic environment in line with the formal Thailand curriculum.

This venue practices dual pricing, where Thai nationals and expats pay around half the price that foreigners do.

Vertigo & Moon Bar

Vertigo offers an al fresco dining experience set atop a roof terrace overlooking the glittering cityscape of Bangkok – a grill-and-bar experience that is Asia’s first. Dine on fork-tender seafood and premium steaks while feasting your eyes on the city’s vast skyline. Moon Bar puts you at ease in an informal setting 61 floors above the city and offers premium drinks, such as the classic Vertigo Sunset, a melody of pineapple, cranberry and lime juices blended with just the right amount of Malibu.

Chao Phraya River

The Chao Phraya is the major river in Thailand, with its low alluvial plain forming the centre of the country. It flows through Bangkok and then into the Gulf of Thailand.

In Bangkok, the Chao Phraya is a major transportation artery for a network of river buses, cross-river ferries, and water taxis (“longtails”). More than 15 boat lines operate on the rivers and canals of the city, including commuter lines.

Emporium Shopping Mall

Emporium is a luxury shopping mall in Khlong Toei District, Bangkok, Thailand. It opened in 1997. It is owned and operated by The Mall Group, who also operate the EmQuartier and Siam Paragon malls in Bangkok.

It is on Sukhumvit Road at Sukhumvit Soi 24 beside Benchasiri Park. It is connected directly to the Phrom Phong Station on the Sukhumvit Line of the BTS Skytrain by a footbridge.

Emporium is a major component of the “EM District” and contains a shopping mall, department store, a luxury cinema “Emprivé Cineclub by SF Corporation”, a high-end supermarket, food court, office building, exhibition hall, children’s play centres and a hotel. Emporium is a popular hub for entertainment, food, and education for local residents and visitors.

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