Things To Do In Guernsey Island

The small hills, white sand beaches and blue water will welcome you when you land in [W:Guernsey Island].

Guernsey is a collection of island with Guernsey its main island. Guernsey can only be reached by plane and boat.

Flight Options

Guernsey airport to Aberdeen ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=ABZ text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Bristol ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=BRS text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Birmingham ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=BHX text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to East Midlands ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=NQT text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Edinburgh ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=EDI text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Exeter ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=EXT text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Glasgow ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=GLA text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Inverness ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=INV text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Leeds ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=LBA text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to London ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=LON text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Newcastle ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=NCL text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Norwich ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=NWI text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Southampton ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=SOU text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

Ireland
Guernsey airport to Dublin ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=DUB text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Belfast ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=BFS text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

France
Guernsey airport to Dinard ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=DNR text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Grenoble ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=LYS text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Chambery winter only
Guernsey airport to Paris CDG ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=PAR text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

Netherlands
Guernsey airport to Amsterdam ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=AMS text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Rotterdam ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=RTM text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

Germany
Guernsey airport to Frankfurt ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=FRA text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Stuttgart ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=STR text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Dusseldorf ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=DUS text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

Switzerland
Guernsey airport to Geneva ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=GVA text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

Spain
Guernsey airport to Malaga ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=AGP text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

Guernsey airport to Alderney ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=ACI text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Isle of Man ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=IOM text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])
Guernsey airport to Jersey ([tp_link origin=GCI destination=JER text_link=”Link” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””])

 

Boat/Ferry Options

Ferries are available from these locations.

France
St Malo (year-round), Dielette (summer only), Granville(summer only)

United Kingdom
Portsmouth, Weymouth, Poole

Jersey
Herm
Sark

Get Around Options

The island is only 19 kilometer long and 5 kilometers wide approximately. There is no train service on the island. Your best option will be to hire a taxi or a car. Bicycle could be better options to get around. Bus would cost you a fixed price of £1 no matter where you go.
One day ticket cost £4.50
Two days ticket cost £7.50
Seven days ticket cost £16.00

 

Things to Do Options

Discovery Pass will offer admission in Castle Cornet, Fort Grey Shipwreck Museum, Guernsey Museum at Candle, German Naval Signals HQ and Jersey Museum and Alderney Museum . This offer is for one adult and all accompanying children under 18 for one year.

[W:Castle Cornet]

Guernsey Museum at Candie
Fort Grey Shipwreck Museum
German Naval Signals HQ
The Aquarium
La Vallette Underground Military Museum
Folk and Costume Museum
German Occupation Museum
Victor Hugo House

 

Food Options

Food is expensive in Guernsey. Local seafood is the best option and is easily available. Mora’s Sawatdi Thai, Pier 17, La Nautique, La Fregate offer nice views and delicious eating choices. There are no fast food outlets like McDonald’s, KFC or Burger King. Victor Hugo offers continental style breakfast and you can check with White Rock cafe, Half Moon Cafe or Halfway Cafe for breakfast.

 

Sleeping Options

Hotel room in Guernsey starts from around $50. Here are your sleeping options in Guernsey.

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=483142 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”] [tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=414283 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”] [tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=413388 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”] [tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=17635 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”] [tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=379100 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]
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Flights & Hotel

Hotel Options in Guernsey Island
Fights to Guernsey Island[/su_note]

Points of Interest | Hokkaido Japan

Its cold but beautiful and awesome when snowing in [W:Hokkaido], [W:Japan].

Hokkaido known for its volcanoes, hot springs and ski resorts. It is the second largest island of Japan. The island is connect to Honshu Island by undersea railway tunnel. The capital of Hokkaido is Sapporo. Hokkaido northern neighbor is [W:Sakhalin Island] which is a Russian territory.

wikipedia.org

Destinations in Hokkaido

Shizunai – You can enjoy cherry blossoms
Noboribetsu – This is the location of largest hot spring resort
Niseko – is a popular ski destination in Hokkaido
Biei – is the location of pretty patchwork mountains

 

How to Reach Hokkaido Island?

Plane

There is an international airport in Sapporo. The airport has flights to [tp_link origin=SPK destination=HKG text_link=”Hong Kong” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””], [tp_link origin=SPK destination=TPE text_link=”Taipei” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””], [tp_link origin=SPK destination=KHH text_link=”Kaohsiung” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””], [tp_link origin=SPK destination=SHA text_link=”Shanghai” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””], [tp_link origin=SPK destination=GUM text_link=”Guam” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””], [tp_link origin=SPK destination=BKK text_link=”Bangkok” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””], [tp_link origin=SPK destination=BJS text_link=”Beijing” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””], [tp_link origin=SPK destination=PUS text_link=”Busan ” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””]and [tp_link origin=SPK destination=SEL text_link=”Seoul” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””].

Flights from Taipei and Seoul go to [tp_link origin=TPE destination=AKJ text_link=”Asahikawa ” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””]and [tp_link origin=SEL destination=HKD text_link=”Hakodate” origin_date=1 destination_date=12 one_way=false type=1 subid=””].

Search more flights here

 

Train

Hokkaido has train service from Honshu Island. In japan there are multiple train services. Hokkaido is served by Shinkansan train network. From Tokyo the train has stopped in 2016.
Hokkaido can also be accessed by Hakucho rail and Super Hakucho rail service between Aomori and Hakodate.

  • Train journey between Sapporo and Hakodate takes 3.5 hours and cost you ¥8,310 one way unreserved seat.
  • Train journey between Sapporo and Asahikawa takes 1.5 hours and cost you ¥4,290 one way unreserved seat.
  • Train journey between Sapporo and Obihiro takes 2.6 hours and cost you ¥6,700 one way unreserved seat.
  • Train journey between Sapporo and Kushiro takes 4.1 hours and cost you ¥8,850 one way unreserved seat.
  • Train journey between Sapporo and Wakkanai takes 5.5 hours and cost you ¥9,930 one way unreserved seat.

Foreigners can buy JR Hokkaido Pass and South Hokkaido Rail Pass. JR Hokkaido Pass give you the options to buy pass for 3, 5 and 7 days. These passes cost you ¥15,430, ¥20,060, and ¥22,630 respectively.  South Hokkaido Rail Pass costs you ¥26,000 if it is bought outside Japan and ¥27,000 if bought inside Japan. The train network in Hokkaido is limited. There are some routes available to major cities. Your best option will be to rent a car there.

JR Hokkaido Pass

South Hokkaido Rail Pass

 

Ferry

You can reach Hokkaido by ferries as well.

Go with Tomakomai that sail to Tsuruga, Niigata, Akita and rarely to Maizuru.
From Hakodate to northern ports of Aomori and Tohoku and Shimokita Peninsula.
Ferry service of Wakkanai take tourist to Russia too.
Otaru ferry service will take you to Maizuru near Kyoto and Seoul.

Bus

Traveling by bus is cheaper but less comfortable. You should use the bus if the train service is not available.

Car

You can go to Hokkaido on car. In order to use a car, you have to buy Hokkaido Expressway Pass. It can cost between ¥3600-¥11300 for 2 to 14 days period.

Rent a Car

Airport Transfers

 

Activities in National Parks

If you want to enjoy hot springs, you can go to Shikotsu-Toya National Park. Lake Toya is one of the most popular tourist destinations.
In southern Hokkaido lies Onuma Quasi-National Park. There is a beautiful lake you should visit.
You should take a bath in hot waterfalls in Shiretoko National Park. You should take precaution in Shiretoko National Park as wild bears roam around. The park is also World Heritage Site.
There are many locations for hiking in Hokkaido. Daisetsuzan National Park offers many opportunities for experienced hikers. The park is the largest in Japan.

Hokkaido tours and travel related options

 

Sleeping Options

3 stars hotels

You can stay in 3 stars hotels for $40-$300 in Hokkaido Island.

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=1198101591 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=777769 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=1604533 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

All 3 star hotels in Hokkaido

4 stars hotels

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=277423 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=359344 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=277299 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

All 4 star hotels in Hokkaido

5 stars hotels

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=673076 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=485325 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

[tp_hotel_widget hotel_id=277430 responsive=true subid=”” powered_by=”true”]

All 5 star hotels in Hokkaido

All hotel options

Things To Do In New York City

Central ParkFile:Southwest corner of Central Park, looking east, NYC.jpg

Central Park is an urban park in Manhattan, New York City. It is located between the Upper West Side and Upper East Side, roughly bounded by Fifth Avenue on the east, Central Park West (Eighth Avenue) on the west, Central Park South (59th Street) on the south, and Central Park North (110th Street) on the north. Central Park is the most visited urban park in the United States, with 40 million visitors in 2013, and one of the most filmed locations in the world. In terms of area, Central Park is the fifth-largest park in New York City, covering 843 acres (341 ha).

911 Memorial & Museum

File:WTCmemorialJune2012.pngThe National September 11 Memorial & Museum (also known as the 9/11 Memorial & Museum) is a memorial and museum in New York City commemorating the September 11, 2001 attacks, which killed 2,977 people, and the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, which killed six. The memorial is located at the World Trade Center site, the former location of the Twin Towers that were destroyed during the September 11 attacks. It is operated by a non-profit institution whose mission is to raise funds for, program, and operate the memorial and museum at the World Trade Center site.

BroadwayFile:Crookfinale.jpg

Broadway theatre commonly known as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres each with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Along with London’s West End theatre, Broadway theatre is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world.

The Theater District is a popular tourist attraction in New York City. According to The Broadway League, for the 2017–2018 season (which ended May 27, 2018), total attendance was 13,792,614 and Broadway shows had US$1,697,458,795 in grosses, with attendance up 3.9%, grosses up 17.1%, and playing weeks up 2.8%.

The majority of Broadway shows are musicals. Historian Martin Shefter argues “‘Broadway musicals,’ culminating in the productions of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, became enormously influential forms of American popular culture” and helped make New York City the cultural capital of the nation.

Metropolitan Museum of ArtFile:The MET.jpg

The Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York City, colloquially “the Met”, is the largest art museum in the United States. With 7.06 million visitors in 2016, it was the third most visited art museum in the world, and the fifth most visited museum of any kind. Its permanent collection contains over two million works, divided among seventeen curatorial departments. The main building, on the eastern edge of Central Park along Museum Mile in Manhattan, is by area one of the world’s largest art galleries. A much smaller second location, The Cloisters at Fort Tryon Park in Upper Manhattan, contains an extensive collection of art, architecture, and artifacts from Medieval Europe. On March 18, 2016, the museum opened the Met Breuer museum at Madison Avenue on the Upper East Side; it extends the museum’s modern and contemporary art program.

American Museum of Natural HistoryFile:USA-NYC-American Museum of Natural History.JPG

The American Museum of Natural History (abbreviated as AMNH), located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City, is one of the largest museums in the world. Located in Theodore Roosevelt Park across the street from Central Park, the museum complex comprises 28 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library. The museum collections contain over 33 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time, and occupies more than 2 million square feet (0.19×106 m2). The museum has a full-time scientific staff of 225, sponsors over 120 special field expeditions each year, and averages about five million visits annually.

Empire State BuildingFile:EmpireStateNewYokCity.jpg

The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon and completed in 1931, the building has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m) and stands a total of 1,454 feet (443.2 m) tall, including its antenna. Its name is derived from “Empire State”, the nickname of New York, which is of unknown origin. As of 2017 the building is the 5th-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States and the 28th-tallest in the world. It is also the 6th-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

Metropolitan Opera HouseFile:Metropolitan Opera House At Lincoln Center 2.jpg

The Metropolitan Opera (commonly known as The Met) is an opera company based in New York City, resident at the Metropolitan Opera House at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The company is operated by the non-profit Metropolitan Opera Association, with Peter Gelb as general manager. The company’s music director-designate is Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

The Met was founded in 1880 as an alternative to the previously established Academy of Music opera house, and debuted in 1883 in a new building on 39th and Broadway (now known as the “Old Met”). It moved to the new Lincoln Center location in 1966.

 

Statue of LibertyFile:Detroit Photographic Company (0707).jpg

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World; French: La Liberté éclairant le monde) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York City, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.

Grand Central TerminalFile:GCT in Blizzard of 2015.jpg

Grand Central Terminal (GCT; also referred to as Grand Central Station or simply as Grand Central) is a commuter rail terminal located at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Grand Central is the southern terminus of the Metro-North Railroad’s Harlem, Hudson and New Haven Lines. The terminal serves Metro-North commuters traveling to the Bronx in New York City; Westchester, Putnam, and Dutchess counties in New York; and Fairfield and New Haven counties in Connecticut. The terminal also contains a connection to the New York City Subway at Grand Central–42nd Street. It is the third-busiest train station in North America after Toronto Union Station and New York Penn Station, and the second-busiest in the United States after New York Penn Station.

Museum of Modern ArtRelated image

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues.

MoMA plays a major role in developing and collecting modernist art, and is often identified as one of the largest and most influential museums of modern art in the world. MoMA’s collection offers an overview of modern and contemporary art, including works of architecture and design, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, prints, illustrated books and artist’s books, film, and electronic media.

New York Public LibraryFile:New York Public Library May 2011.JPG

The New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City. With nearly 53 million items and 92 locations, the New York Public Library is the second largest public library in the United States (behind the Library of Congress) and the third largest in the world. It is a private, non-governmental, independently managed, nonprofit corporation operating with both private and public financing. The library has branches in the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island and affiliations with academic and professional libraries in the metropolitan area of New York State. The City of New York’s other two boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, are served by the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Library, respectively. The branch libraries are open to the general public and consist of circulating libraries. The New York Public Library also has four research libraries, which are also open to the general public.

The High LineFile:High Line 20th Street looking downtown.jpg

The High Line is a 1.45-mile-long (2.33 km) elevated linear park, greenway and rail trail created on a former New York Central Railroad spur on the west side of Manhattan in New York City. The High Line’s design is a collaboration between James Corner Field Operations (Project Lead), Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf. The abandoned spur has been redesigned as a “living system” drawing from multiple disciplines which include landscape architecture, urban design, and ecology. Since opening in 2009, the High Line has become an icon of contemporary landscape architecture.

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge Postdlf.jpg

The Brooklyn Bridge is a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge in New York City. It connects the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn, spanning the East River. The Brooklyn Bridge has a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m) and a height of 276.5 ft (84.3 m) above mean high water. It is one of the oldest roadway bridges in the United States and was the world’s first steel-wire suspension bridge, as well as the first fixed crossing across the East River.

Fifth Avenue

Photograph of Fifth Avenue from the Metropolitan—New York City.jpg

Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It stretches north from Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village to West 143rd Street in Harlem. It is considered one of the most expensive and elegant streets in the world.

Bryant ParkFile:New-York - Bryant Park.jpg

Bryant Park is a 9.603-acre (38,860 m2) privately managed public park located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is located between Fifth and Sixth Avenues and between 40th and 42nd Streets in Midtown Manhattan. Although technically the Main Branch of the New York Public Library is located within the park, effectively it forms the park’s functional eastern boundary, making Sixth Avenue the park’s primary entrance. Bryant Park is located entirely over an underground structure that houses the library’s stacks, which were built in the 1980s when the park was closed to the public and excavated; the new library facilities were built below ground level while the park was restored above it.

Ellis IslandFile:Arriving at Ellis Island LCCN2014710704.jpg

Ellis Island, in Upper New York Bay, was the gateway for over 12 million immigrants to the U.S. as the United States’ busiest immigrant inspection station for over 60 years[8] from 1892 until 1954. Ellis Island was opened January 1, 1892. The island was greatly expanded with land reclamation between 1892 and 1934. Before that, the much smaller original island was the site of Fort Gibson and later a naval magazine. The island was made part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument in 1965 and has hosted a museum of immigration since 1990.

The GuggenheimFile:NYC - Guggenheim Museum.jpg

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, often referred to as The Guggenheim, is an art museum located at 1071 Fifth Avenue on the corner of East 89th Street in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is the permanent home of a continuously expanding collection of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, early Modern and contemporary art and also features special exhibitions throughout the year. The museum was established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939 as the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, under the guidance of its first director, the artist Hilla von Rebay. It adopted its current name after the death of its founder, Solomon R. Guggenheim, in 1952.

Radio City Music Hall

Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located at 1260 Avenue of the Americas at Rockefeller Center in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Nicknamed the Showplace of the Nation, it was for a time the leading tourist destination in the city. The venue is notable as the headquarters for the precision dance company, the Rockettes.

Rockefeller Center and Top the Rock Observation Deck

Image result for Rockefeller Center

Rockefeller Center is a large complex consisting of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres (89,000 m2) between 48th and 51st Streets, facing Fifth Avenue, in New York City. Commissioned by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan. The 14 original Art Deco buildings span the area between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, split by a large sunken square and a private street called Rockefeller Plaza. Five International Style buildings, built later, are located on the west side of Sixth Avenue and at the north end of Rockefeller Plaza.

Times Square

Official logo of Times Square

Times Square is a major commercial intersection, tourist destination, entertainment center and neighborhood in the Midtown Manhattan section of New York City at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue. It stretches from West 42nd to West 47th Streets. Brightly adorned with billboards and advertisements, Times Square is sometimes referred to as “The Crossroads of the World”, “The Center of the Universe”, “the heart of The Great White Way”, and the “heart of the world”. One of the world’s busiest pedestrian areas, it is also the hub of the Broadway Theater District and a major center of the world’s entertainment industry. Times Square is one of the world’s most visited tourist attractions, drawing an estimated 50 million visitors annually. Approximately 330,000 people pass through Times Square daily, many of them tourists, while over 460,000 pedestrians walk through Times Square on its busiest days.

Frick Collection

Henry C Frick House 001.JPG

The Frick Collection is an art museum located in the Henry Clay Frick House on the Upper East Side in Manhattan, New York City at 1 East 70th Street, at the northeast corner with Fifth Avenue. It houses the collection of industrialist Henry Clay Frick (1849–1919).

Apollo Theater

Image result for Apollo Theater

The Apollo Theater is a music hall located at 253 West 125th Street between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (formerly Seventh Avenue) and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (formerly Eighth Avenue) in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is a noted venue for African-American performers, and is the home of Showtime at the Apollo, a nationally syndicated television variety show which showcased new talent, from 1987 to 2008, encompassing 1,093 episodes; the show was rebooted in 2018.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

The Cathedral of St. Patrick (commonly called St. Patrick’s Cathedral) is a decorated Neo-Gothic-style Roman Catholic cathedral church in the United States and a prominent landmark of New York City. It is the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York as well as parish church, located on the east side of Fifth Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets in Midtown Manhattan, directly across the street from Rockefeller Center, facing the Atlas statue. It is considered one of the most visible symbols of Roman Catholicism in New York City and the United States.

Bronx Zoo

Bronx Zoo 001.jpg

The Bronx Zoo is a zoo located within Bronx Park in the Bronx, a borough of New York City. It is one of the largest zoos in the United States by area, comprising 265 acres (107 ha) of park lands and naturalistic habitats separated by the Bronx River. On average, the zoo has 2.15 million visitors each year.

Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco–style skyscraper located on the East Side of Midtown Manhattan in New York City, at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue in the Turtle Bay neighborhood of Manhattan. At 1,046 feet (318.9 m), the structure was the world’s tallest building for 11 months before it was surpassed by the Empire State Building in 1931. It is the tallest brick building in the world with a steel framework. As of 2018, the Chrysler is the eighth-tallest building in the city, tied with The New York Times Building.

Coney Island

Image result for Coney Island

Coney Island is a peninsular residential neighborhood, beach, and leisure/entertainment destination of Long Island on the Coney Island Channel, which is part of the Lower Bay in the southwestern part of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. Coney Island was formerly the westernmost of the Outer Barrier islands on Long Island’s southern shore, but in the early 20th century it became connected to the rest of Long Island by land fill. The residential portion of the peninsula is a community of 60,000 people in its western part, with Sea Gate to its west, Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach to its east, the Lower Bay to the south, and Gravesend to the north.

Gulliver’s Gate

Image result for Gulliver's Gate

A Giant Experience in a Miniature World!

Gulliver’s Gate is a technologically advanced, interactive and immersive world of miniatures covering 50,000 square feet that will ignite your imagination and challenge your perspective.

Ice Skating in NYC

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Make the most of the winter at these top ice-skating rinks in New York City (NYC), where you can ice skate at famous New York ice rinks in some pretty fabulous places like Rockefeller Center and Central Park.

Most city rinks stay open from November through March, affording a wide window of time to plan your winter outing​ and to sample multiple rinks throughout the season. If you are not a skater, most rinks offer classes.

Things To Do In Singapore

Gardens by the Bay

Image result for Gardens by the Bay Singapore hd wall

Gardens by the Bay is a nature park spanning 101 hectares (250 acres) of reclaimed land in the Central Region of Singapore, adjacent to the Marina Reservoir. The park consists of three waterfront gardens: Bay South Garden (in Marina South), Bay East Garden (in Marina East) and Bay Central Garden (in Downtown Core and Kallang). The largest of the gardens is Bay South Garden at 54 hectares (130 acres). Its Flower Dome is the largest glass greenhouse in the world.

Gardens by the Bay is part of the nation’s plans to transform its “Garden City” to a “City in a Garden”, with the aim of raising the quality of life by enhancing greenery and flora in the city. First announced by the Prime Minister, Lee Hsien Loong, at the National Day Rally in 2005, Gardens by the Bay was intended to be Singapore’s premier urban outdoor recreation space, and a national icon.

Being one of the popular tourist attractions in Singapore, the park received 6.4 million visitors in 2014, while topping its 20 millionth visitor mark in November 2015.

Singapore Botanic Gardens

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The Singapore Botanic Gardens is a 158-year-old tropical garden located at the fringe of Singapore’s Orchard Road shopping district. It is one of three gardens, and the only tropical garden, to be honoured as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Botanic Gardens has been ranked Asia’s top park attraction since 2013, by TripAdvisor Travellers’ Choice Awards. It was declared the inaugural Garden of the Year, International Garden Tourism Awards in 2012, and received Michelin’s three-star rating in 2008.

The Botanic Gardens was founded at its present site in 1859 by an agri-horticultural society. It played a pivotal role in the region’s rubber trade boom in the early twentieth century, when its first scientific director Henry Nicholas Ridley, headed research into the plant’s cultivation. By perfecting the technique of rubber extraction, still in use today, and promoting its economic value to planters in the region, rubber output expanded rapidly. At its height in the 1920s, the Malayan peninsula cornered half of the global latex production.

Marina Bay

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Marina Bay Sands is an integrated resort fronting Marina Bay in Singapore, owned by the Las Vegas Sands corporation. At its opening in 2010, it was billed as the world’s most expensive standalone casino property at S$8 billion, including the land cost. The resort, designed by Moshe Safdie, includes a 2,561-room hotel, a 120,000-square-metre (1,300,000 sq ft) convention-exhibition centre, the 74,000-square-metre (800,000 sq ft) The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands mall, a museum, two large theatres, “celebrity chef” restaurants, two floating Crystal Pavilions, art-science exhibits, and the world’s largest atrium casino with 500 tables and 1,600 slot machines. The complex is topped by a 340-metre-long (1,120 ft) SkyPark with a capacity of 3,900 people and a 150 m (490 ft) infinity swimming pool, set on top of the world’s largest public cantilevered platform, which overhangs the north tower by 67 m (220 ft). The 20-hectare resort was designed by Moshe Safdie architects.

Chinatown

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Chinatown is a subzone and ethnic enclave located within the Outram district in the Central Area of Singapore. Featuring distinctly Chinese cultural elements, Chinatown has had a historically concentrated ethnic Chinese population.

As the largest ethnic group in Singapore is Chinese, Chinatown is considerably less of an enclave than it once was. However, the precinct does retain significant historical and cultural significance. Large sections of it have been declared national heritage sites officially designated for conservation by the Urban Redevelopment Authority.

Singapore Zoo

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The Singapore Zoo, formerly known as the Singapore Zoological Gardens and commonly known locally as the Mandai Zoo, occupies 28 hectares (69 acres) on the margins of Upper Seletar Reservoir within Singapore’s heavily forested central catchment area. The zoo was built at a cost of $9 million granted by the government of Singapore and opened on 27 June 1973. It is operated by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, who also manage the neighbouring Night Safari, River Safari and the Jurong Bird Park. There are about 315 species of animal in the zoo, of which some 16 percent are considered to be threatened species. The zoo attracts 1.7 million visitors each year.

From the beginning, Singapore Zoo followed the modern trend of displaying animals in naturalistic, ‘open’ exhibits with hidden barriers, moats, and glass between the animals and visitors. It houses the largest captive colony of orangutans in the world.

Orchard Road

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Orchard Road is a 2.2 kilometre-long major road in the Central Area of Singapore. Often known colloquially as Orchard, the area is a major shopping belt and tourist attraction.

The Orchard Planning Area is a planning area as specified by the Urban Redevelopment Authority. It is part of the Central Area located within the Central Region. Orchard is bordered by Newton in the east and north, Tanglin in the west, River Valley in the south and Museum to the southeast.

Merlion Park

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Orchard Road is a 2.2 kilometre-long major road in the Central Area of Singapore. Often known colloquially as Orchard, the area is a major shopping belt and tourist attraction.

The Orchard Planning Area is a planning area as specified by the Urban Redevelopment Authority. It is part of the Central Area located within the Central Region. Orchard is bordered by Newton in the east and north, Tanglin in the west, River Valley in the south and Museum to the southeast.

Sentosa

Related imageSentosa, previously called Pulau Blakang Mati, is a resort island in Singapore. It was once a British military base and a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp, and many Chinese were found killed on its beach during the Japanese occupation. The island was renamed Sentosa and turned into a tourist destination in 1972, and it is now home to a popular resort that receives some twenty million visitors per year. Attractions include a 2 km (1.2 mi) long sheltered beach, Fort Siloso, two golf courses, the Merlion, 14 hotels, and the Resorts World Sentosa, featuring the theme park Universal Studios Singapore and one of Singapore’s two casinos.

Singapore Flyer

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The Singapore Flyer is a giant Ferris wheel in Singapore. Described by its operators as an observation wheel, it opened in 2008, construction having taken about 2½ years. It carried its first paying passengers on 11 February, opened to the public on 1 March, and was officially opened on 15 April. It has 28 air-conditioned capsules, each able to accommodate 28 passengers, and incorporates a three-storey terminal building.

The Flyer has an overall height of 165 metres (541 ft) and was the world’s tallest Ferris wheel until the 167.6 m (550 ft) High Roller, which is 2.6 m (9 ft) taller than the Flyer, opened on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, US, on 31 March 2014. The previous record holder, the Star of Nanchang, in Jiangxi, China, is 160 m (525 ft) tall, although its 153 m (502 ft) diameter wheel is larger than the Flyer’s 150 m (492 ft) wheel.

Little India

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Little India is an ethnic district in Singapore. It is located east of the Singapore River—across from Chinatown, located west of the river—and north of Kampong Glam. Both areas are part of the urban planning area of Rochor. Little India is commonly known as Tekka in the Indian Singaporean community.

Asian Civilization Museum

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The Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) is an institution which forms a part of the four museums in Singapore, the other three being the Peranakan Museum at Old Tao Nan School, the National Museum of Singapore and the Singapore Art Museum.

It is one of the pioneering museums in the region to specialise in pan-Asian cultures and civilisations. The museum specialises in the material history of China, Southeast Asia, South Asia and West Asia, from which the diverse ethnic groups of Singapore trace their ancestry.

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Things To Do In London

Buckingham Palace

A trip to London is incomplete without strolling through Green Park to catch a glimpse of Buckingham Palace. The palace has been home to the British Royal Family since 1837. It features 775 rooms and the largest private garden in London.

Some of the palace is open to visitors so you can see a little piece of the royal lifestyle. From outside, watch the world-famous Changing of the Guard. This procedure happens a few times every day and is a great opportunity to witness a historic tradition and the utmost discipline of the Royal Guard – who are all wearing the iconic London bearskin.

Step inside the Palace of Westminster

Westminster is considered the political hub of London and is home to the Houses of Parliament and the world-famous Big Ben. Big Ben is the name of the bell housed within the iconic clock tower, and it still chimes every hour.

You can also find Westminster Abbey here, which is open to the public most days. Whilst visiting these landmarks, be sure to rest your feet in Parliament Square which features statues of important political individuals including Nelson Mandela and Winston Churchill.

Meridian Line at Greenwich’s Royal Observatory

The Royal Observatory, Greenwich is an observatory situated on a hill in Greenwich Park, overlooking the River Thames. It played a major role in the history of astronomy and navigation, and is best known for the fact that the prime meridian passes through it, and thereby gave its name to Greenwich Mean Time. The ROG has the IAU observatory code of 000, the first in the list. ROG, the National Maritime Museum, the Queen’s House and Cutty Sark are collectively designated Royal Museums Greenwich.

The scientific work of the observatory was relocated elsewhere in stages in the first half of the 20th century, and the Greenwich site is now maintained almost exclusively as a museum, although the AMAT telescope became operational for astronomical research in 2018.

Get lost in the Barbican Conservatory

The Barbican Conservatory is the second largest conservatory in London, located at the Barbican Centre. It houses more than 2000 species of plants and trees, as well as terrapins and koi carp. The conservatory covers 23,000 square feet (2,100 m2), and is located on top of the theatre’s fly tower.

Admission to the conservatory is free but public opening times are very limited; currently only afternoons on Sundays and some Bank holiday Mondays. Opening days and times are given on the Barbican website. The conservatory can be hired for meetings and receptions.

Watch ‘Hamilton’ at the Victoria Palace Theatre

The Victoria Palace Theatre is a West End theatre in Victoria Street, in the City of Westminster, opposite Victoria Station.

The theatre began life as a small concert room above the stables of the Royal Standard Hotel, a small hotel and tavern built in 1832 at what was then 522 Stockbridge Terrace, on the site of the present theatre – not, as sometimes stated, on land where the train station now stands. The proprietor, John Moy, enlarged the building, and by 1850 it became known as Moy’s Music Hall. Alfred Brown took it over in 1863, refurbished it, and renamed it the Royal Standard Music Hall.

Walk the canals of Little Venice

Little Venice is a neighbourhood in London, England, around the junction of the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal and the Regent’s Canal. Many of its buildings are Regency white painted stucco terraced town houses and taller blocks (mansions) in the same style. To the south is Paddington Basin and Hyde Park.

The Little Venice ward of the City of Westminster had 11,040 residents in 2015. Warwick Avenue runs through the area, which is also served by a tube station of the same name.

Spot deer in Richmond Park

Richmond Park, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, was created by Charles I in the 17th century as a deer park. The largest of London’s Royal Parks, it is of national and international importance for wildlife conservation. The park is a national nature reserve, a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a Special Area of Conservation and is included, at Grade I, on Historic England’s Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of special historic interest in England. Its landscapes have inspired many famous artists and it has been a location for several films and TV series.

National Theatre

The Royal National Theatre in London, commonly known as the National Theatre (NT), is one of the United Kingdom’s three most prominent publicly funded performing arts venues, alongside the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal Opera House. Internationally, it is known as the National Theatre of Great Britain.

From its foundation in 1963 until 1976, the company was based at the Old Vic theatre in Waterloo. The current building is located next to the Thames in the South Bank area of central London. In addition to performances at the National Theatre building, the National Theatre tours productions at theatres across the United Kingdom.

London Eye

A trip to London isn’t complete without a visit to the iconic London Eye. Originally constructed to celebrate the millennium, the Eye is a giant ferris wheel offering gorgeous views across the city. At night, the wheel is lit up in seasonal colors and is the centerpiece of London’s annual New Year’s fireworks display.

You can share one of the spacious pods with other keen visitors, or splurge on a private pod for you and someone special. Team your visit to the Eye with a trip to the adjacent London Aquarium to see aquatic creatures from around the world, including jellyfish, seahorses and crocodiles.

Shoreditch

Shoreditch is one of the trendiest areas of London having recently undergone extensive regeneration. It is now one of the hottest nightlife spots in the city and one of the coolest places to stay in London.

Packed full of bars and eateries, it’s the perfect place to spend a day and an evening. Check out Trapeze, a circus-themed bar that serves endlessly inventive drinks out of popcorn tub-style cups.

For pop culture lovers, there’s Far Rockaway, a chilled bar and restaurant filled with comic books, band posters and a regular 90s night. Or visit the Blues Kitchen for a blues night accompanied by sticky ribs and other American staples.

Hampstead Heath

Hampstead Heath is one of the largest parks in London, covering a massive 790 acres. It sits atop of one of the highest points in London, offering excellent views of the city from Parliament Hill.

The Heath features grassy fields, wooded areas, and a number of large ponds. It is the best place to experience nature in London with plenty of wildlife around and small woods in which to get lost.

British Film Institute

The BFI – or British Film Institute – is a must-see for film lovers. The BFI is situated on the ever-popular Southbank and is the perfect spot to relax after a stroll along the waterfront taking in the culture and atmosphere of this vibrant part of the city.

The BFI show films every day, from mainstream blockbusters to reshowings of cult classics to one-off screenings of indie hits. There is also a library and shop for those who like to take their cinema seriously. The BFI also houses its own bar and riverfront restaurant for a delicious meal or to chat about the latest film releases over some drinks.

Thames Cruise

The Thames is the lifeblood of London, bringing industry to the city for centuries. It is England’s longest river, leading into the North Sea at its end. It has been the base for settlements since prehistoric times, and was a strategic importance to the Romans and English Kings, as well as during both World Wars.

There are a number of companies in London offering cruises across the Thames. Cruises run as regularly as every 30 minutes from several key locations. The cruises pass several key sightseeing locations, including Tower Bridge, the Houses of Parliament, and the London Eye.

Baker Street

One of the cultural staples of London is Baker Street, best known as the street that Arthur Conan Doyle’s infamous detective Sherlock Holmes lived on.

Today you can find a Sherlock Holmes museum near the Underground station, especially popular after the BBC revival ‘Sherlock’.

Madame Tussauds is just around the corner, the internationally-famous wax museum where you can pose with your favorite celebrities.

Afterwards, escape the crowds of Baker Street in the nearby Regent’s Park, or by climbing Primrose Hill for London’s most spectacular view of the city.

Brixton Academy

For those on a hunt for live music, London has thousands of unique venues to offer. Venues span every niche or you can just go to an open night at a local pub and see some up-and-coming musicians. One of d best venues in town, though, is Brixton Academy in south London.

The Academy was originally a theater and cinema called the Astoria, opened in 1929. Fifty years later, the venue became the Academy and now hosts some of the biggest rock and pop acts in the world.

Chinatown

Chinatown is an ethnic enclave in the City of Westminster, London, bordering Soho to its north and west, Theatreland to the south and east. The enclave currently occupies the area in and around Gerrard Street. It contains a number of Chinese restaurants, bakeries, supermarkets, souvenir shops, and other Chinese-run businesses. The name Chinatown has been used at different times to describe different places in Greater London.

Hyde Park

Hyde Park is possibly the most famous park in London, and it is one of the largest. The park has historical significance, having hosted a number of demonstrations and protests including protests by the Suffragettes.

The park’s famous Speaker’s Corner is still occupied by debates, protests, and performance artists every week. The park is home to several memorial features, as well as two bodies of water, the most famous being the Serpentine. Here you can go paddle-boating, see a number of swans, and take in a breath of fresh air in the center of the city. A must-visit.

Camden

Camden is a well-known cultural neighborhood in north London. Known for its alternative culture, the crowds here are filled with goths, punks, rockabillies and tourists alike. Camden has a vibrant body mod community and you will find a number of piercing and tattoo shops in this part of town.

Camden Market is eclectic and diverse, featuring street food from international cuisines, and lots of stalls selling trinkets and unique artwork to take home. Rummage through vintage clothing racks, find a used book to take on your travels, or visit one of the city’s best vegan bakeries at Cookies And Scream.

After your shopping spree, stroll down to Camden Lock to relax by Regent’s Canal or walk along the water all the way to King’s Cross.

The O2

The O2 Arena was originally constructed in celebration of the millennium, under the name of ‘the Millennium Dome’. It once acted as exhibition center with various exhibits and hands-on activities aimed primarily at children.

Today, it is a premier destination for live music and stage shows, hosting the biggest names in entertainment on a regular basis. It also houses a cinema as well as various bars and restaurants featuring cuisines from all over the world.

The O2 is an ideal spot to hang out with friends. If you’re seeking some adventure, try climbing to the top of the O2. On these guided walks, you can climb along the dome to the roof where you will witness beautiful views of the city. Afterwards, take the Emirates Air Line across the water. The Air Line is a cable car link offering an exciting and unique view of the city.

Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus is instantly recognizable, a square filled with bright lights and big electronic screens. Piccadilly Circus has been a busy London spot since the 17th century when it was a commercial hub.

Today it is still the heart of the West End, with easy access from Piccadilly Circus to some of London’s biggest theaters and nightclubs, including the Criterion Theatre. The Statue of Eros in the center of the circus is itself a popular meeting point and tourist destination.

Pay a visit to Ripley’s Believe it or Not museum at Piccadilly Circus to learn some new facts and see the world’s weirdest things. The Trocadero houses a games arcade and some niche shops to satisfy any pop culture cravings.

Brick Lane

Brick Lane was made famous by the book and film adaptation of the same title. As the book’s narrative made clear, Brick Lane is the heart of London’s Bangladeshi community. An incredibly diverse neighborhood, Brick Lane features road signs in both English and Bengali, and is well-known for its abundance of curry houses.

This is the perfect spot to find something spicy to eat but be sure to go to one of the many sweet shops for some authentic South Asian desserts. The area also features a number of trendy bars as well as regular marketplaces, attracting a young and fashionable crowd.

For an art fix, head around the corner to find Whitechapel Gallery – or hunt down the many pieces of street art on Brick Lane and its neighboring streets.

Oxford Street

Oxford Street is not only London’s top spot for shopping but is Europe’s busiest shopping street. It has 300 shops and receives over 500,000 visitors every day.

Shop ‘til you drop in designer stores and internationally-famous department stores like Debenhams and House of Fraser. Selfridges features intricate and beautiful window displays that change with the seasons. These frequently feature interactive windows and work by acclaimed artists.

Around Christmas, the Oxford Street Christmas lights illuminate your shopping sprees and add some glitter to the evenings.

Leicester Square

Walk in the footsteps of Hollywood stars by paying a visit to Leicester Square. The square is most famous for hosting film premieres to some of the biggest blockbusters. In fact, the square has been a London hotspot since 1670 and an entertainment center since the 19th century.

The square is surrounded by a number of cinemas with some of the city’s biggest screens, as well as a variety of restaurants. The garden in the center of the square is perfect for cooling off in during the summer or resting your feet after a long day of exploring London.

Visit the Prince Charles Cinema for cult films, singalong screenings, and epic marathon nights. Leicester Square also hosts celebrations for the Chinese New Year where you can see traditional dancing dragons and get lost in the crowds.

Harrods

Harrods is one of London’s most famous department stores, known particularly for serving the elite and the super-rich. Since opening in 1824, Harrods’ patrons have included Oscar Wilde, Laurence Olivier and the Royal Family.

The luxury is spread across a number of floors, laid out in style through Harrods’ themed halls. The food hall sells indulgent delicacies from fresh meat and cheese to superior marmalades and pates. The Egyptian hall sells fashion in opulent style to make you feel like a pharaoh as you pass through.

Platform 9 ¾

King’s Cross is one of the city’s busiest locations with a train station that has been open since 1852 serving much of the country. Recent renovations have given a sleek, modern look to the station – try to find the hidden tunnel with walls that light up with art.

But for many people around the world, King’s Cross is known best for something else: the station that Harry Potter uses to journey to Hogwarts. Now you can visit Platform 9 ¾ in real life, in King’s Cross railway station.

Pose besides a luggage trolley disappearing magically into the wall and have your photo taken to commemorate your wizarding journey forever! Don’t forget to wear house colors.

Bond Street

Bond Street connects to Oxford Street and is a popular shopping district in its own right. Bond Street differs to Oxford Street in its selection of stores, with a much greater focus on the exclusive and the designer. Bond Street is one of the most expensive shopping streets in London and is worth visiting for a taste of the indulgent.

Galleries

London is an ideal city for art lovers with so many galleries to visit, featuring the best in classic and contemporary art. Most of the city’s galleries are free to visitors, including the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. The National Gallery has something for everyone with work by da Vinci, Turner, van Gogh and Rembrandt on display.

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Things To Do In Paris

Eiffel Tower Tour

The Eiffel Tower is a wrought-iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Constructed from 1887–1889 as the entrance to the 1889 World’s Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France’s leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognisable structures in the world. The Eiffel Tower is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015.
The tower has three levels for visitors, with restaurants on the first and second levels. The top level’s upper platform is 276 m (906 ft) above the ground – the highest observation deck accessible to the public in the European Union. Tickets can be purchased to ascend by stairs or lift to the first and second levels. The climb from ground level to the first level is over 300 steps, as is the climb from the first level to the second. Although there is a staircase to the top level, it is usually accessible only by lift.

Louvre Museum

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The Louvre or the Louvre Museum is the world’s largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the city’s 1st arrondissement (district or ward). Approximately 38,000 objects from prehistory to the 21st century are exhibited over an area of 72,735 square metres (782,910 square feet). In 2017, the Louvre was the world’s most visited art museum, receiving 8.1 million visitors.

The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace, originally built as the Louvre castle in the late 12th to 13th century under Philip II. Remnants of the fortress are visible in the basement of the museum. Due to the urban expansion of the city, the fortress eventually lost its defensive function and, in 1546, was converted by Francis I into the main residence of the French Kings. The building was extended many times to form the present Louvre Palace. In 1682, Louis XIV chose the Palace of Versailles for his household, leaving the Louvre primarily as a place to display the royal collection, including, from 1692, a collection of ancient Greek and Roman sculpture. In 1692, the building was occupied by the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres and the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture, which in 1699 held the first of a series of salons. The Académie remained at the Louvre for 100 years. During the French Revolution, the National Assembly decreed that the Louvre should be used as a museum to display the nation’s masterpieces.

Versailles Palace

The Palace of Versailles was the principal royal residence of France from 1682 under Louis XIV until the start of the French Revolution in 1789 under Louis XVI. It is located in the department of Yvelines, in the region of Île-de-France, about 20 kilometres (12 miles) southwest of the centre of Paris.

The palace is now a Monument historique and UNESCO World Heritage site, notable especially for the ceremonial Hall of Mirrors, the jewel-like Royal Opera, and the royal apartments; for the more intimate royal residences, the Grand Trianon and Petit Trianon located within the park; the small rustic Hameau (Hamlet) created for Marie Antoinette; and the vast Gardens of Versailles with fountains, canals, and geometric flower beds and groves, laid out by André le Nôtre. The Palace was stripped of all its furnishings after the French Revolution, but many pieces have been returned and many of the palace rooms have been restored.

In 2017 the Palace of Versailles received 7,700,000 visitors, making it the second-most visited monument in the Île-de-France region, just behind the Louvre and ahead of the Eiffel Tower.

Champs-Elysees

The Avenue des Champs-Élysées is an avenue in the 8th arrondissement of Paris, France, 1.9 kilometres (1.2 mi) long and 70 metres (230 ft) wide, running between the Place de la Concorde and the Place Charles de Gaulle, where the Arc de Triomphe is located. It is known for its theatres, cafés, and luxury shops, for the annual Bastille Day military parade, and as the finish of the Tour de France cycle race.

The name is French for the Elysian Fields, the paradise for dead heroes in Greek mythology. Champs-Élysées is widely regarded to be one of the most recognisable avenues in the world.

Notre-Dame Cathedral

Notre-Dame de Paris also known as Notre-Dame Cathedral or simply Notre-Dame, is a medieval Catholic cathedral on the Île de la Cité in the fourth arrondissement of Paris, France. The cathedral is widely considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture. The innovative use of the rib vault and flying buttress, the enormous and colorful rose windows, and the naturalism and abundance of its sculptural decoration all set it apart from earlier Romanesque architecture.

The cathedral was begun in 1160 and largely completed by 1260, though it was modified frequently in the following centuries. In the 1790s, Notre-Dame suffered desecration during the French Revolution when much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. Soon after the publication of Victor Hugo’s novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame in 1831, popular interest in the building revived. A major restoration project supervised by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc began in 1845 and continued for twenty-five years. Beginning in 1963, the facade of the Cathedral was cleaned of centuries of soot and grime, returning it to its original color. Another campaign of cleaning and restoration was carried out from 1991-2000.

As the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Paris, Notre-Dame contains the cathedra of the Archbishop of Paris, currently Michel Aupetit. 12 million people visit Notre-Dame yearly, which makes it the most visited monument in Paris.

Le Marais

Le Marais is a historic district in Paris, France. Long the aristocratic district of Paris, it hosts many outstanding buildings of historic and architectural importance. It spreads across parts of the 3rd and 4th arrondissements in Paris (on the Rive Droite, or Right Bank, of the Seine). Le Marais is today the trendiest shopping district in Paris with the top stores in Rue des Francs-Bourgeois and Rue des Rosiers. The most famous stores are BHV Marais, Merci: and Uniqlo Le Marais.

Sacred Heart of Basilica of Montmartre

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris, commonly known as Sacré-Cœur Basilica and often simply Sacré-Cœur, is a Roman Catholic church and minor basilica, dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in Paris, France. A popular landmark and the second most visited monument in Paris, the basilica is located at the summit of the butte Montmartre, the highest point in the city. Sacré-Cœur is a double monument, political and cultural, both a national penance for the defeat of France in the 1870 Franco-Prussian War and the socialist Paris Commune of 1871 crowning its most rebellious neighborhood, and an embodiment of conservative moral order, publicly dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, which was an increasingly popular vision of a loving and sympathetic Christ.

The basilica was designed by Paul Abadie. Construction began in 1875 and was completed in 1914. The basilica was consecrated after the end of World War I in 1919.

Musee d’Orsay

The Musée d’Orsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the Left Bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d’Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1914, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-Impressionist masterpieces in the world, by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Many of these works were held at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume prior to the museum’s opening in 1986. It is one of the largest art museums in Europe. Musée d’Orsay had 3.177 million visitors in 2017.

Pere-lachaise Cemetery (Free)

Père Lachaise Cemetery formerly cimetière de l’Est, “Cemetery of the East”) is the largest cemetery in Paris, France (44 hectares or 110 acres). With more than 3.5 million visitors annually, it is the most visited cemetery in the world.

Père Lachaise is located in the 20th arrondissement and notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery in Paris. It is also the site of three World War I memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on Line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station named Père Lachaise, on both Line 2 and Line 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on Line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery.

Opera National de Paris

The Paris Opera is the primary opera company of France. It was founded in 1669 by Louis XIV as the Académie d’Opéra, and shortly thereafter was placed under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste Lully and officially renamed the Académie Royale de Musique, but continued to be known more simply as the Opéra. Classical ballet as it is known today arose within the Paris Opera as the Paris Opera Ballet and has remained an integral and important part of the company. Currently called the Opéra National de Paris, it mainly produces operas at its modern 2700-seat theatre Opéra Bastille which opened in 1989, and ballets and some classical operas at the older 1970-seat Palais Garnier which opened in 1875. Small scale and contemporary works are also staged in the 500-seat Amphitheatre under the Opéra Bastille.

The company’s annual budget is in the order of 200 million euros, of which 100 million come from the French state and 70 million from box office receipts. With this money, the company runs the two houses and supports a large permanent staff, which includes the orchestra of 170, a chorus of 110 and the corps de ballet of 150.

Each year, the Opéra presents about 380 performances of opera, ballet and other concerts, to a total audience of about 800,000 people (of whom 17% come from abroad), which is a very good average seat occupancy rate of 94%. In the 2012/13 season, the Opéra presented 18 opera titles (two in a double bill), 13 ballets, 5 symphonic concerts and two vocal recitals, plus 15 other programmes. The company’s training bodies are also active, with 7 concerts from the Atelier Lyrique and 4 programmes from the École de Danse.

Luxembourg Garens (Free)

Luxembourg Gardens, Paris is an oil painting by Albert Edelfelt completed in 1887 of a scene in the Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris, France. The painting has become a kind of symbol of Edelfelt and the whole of Finnish art, at a time when Paris was the center of the whole art world. The work is also a larger Edelfelt paintings and a major en plein air painting.
Arc de Triomphe

Centre Pompidou

Centre Georges Pompidou commonly shortened to Centre Pompidou and also known as the Pompidou Centre in English, is a complex building in the Beaubourg area of the 4th arrondissement of Paris, near Les Halles, rue Montorgueil, and the Marais. It was designed in the style of high-tech architecture by the architectural team of Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano, along with Gianfranco Franchini.

It houses the Bibliothèque publique d’information (Public Information Library), a vast public library; the Musée National d’Art Moderne, which is the largest museum for modern art in Europe; and IRCAM, a centre for music and acoustic research. Because of its location, the Centre is known locally as Beaubourg. It is named after Georges Pompidou, the President of France from 1969 to 1974 who commissioned the building, and was officially opened on 31 January 1977 by President Valéry Giscard d’Estaing. As of 2006, the Centre Pompidou has had over 180 million visitors since 1977 and more than 5,209,678 visitors in 2013, including 3,746,899 for the museum.

The sculpture Horizontal by Alexander Calder, a free-standing mobile that is 7.6 m (25 ft) tall, was placed in front of the Centre Pompidou in 2012.

Musee Roden

The Musée Rodin in Paris, France, is a museum that was opened in 1919, dedicated to the works of the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. It has two sites: the Hôtel Biron and surrounding grounds in central Paris and just outside Paris at Rodin’s old home, the Villa des Brillants at Meudon (Hauts-de-Seine). The collection includes 6,600 sculptures, 8,000 drawings, 8,000 old photographs, and 7,000 objets d’art. The museum receives 700,000 visitors annually.

While living in the Villa des Brillants, Rodin used the Hôtel Biron as his workshop from 1908 and subsequently donated his entire collection of sculptures (along with paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Claude Monet, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir that he had acquired) to the French State on the condition that they turn the buildings into a museum dedicated to his works.

The Musée Rodin contains most of Rodin’s significant creations, including The Thinker, The Kiss, and The Gates of Hell. Many of his sculptures are displayed in the museum’s extensive garden. The museum includes a room dedicated to the works of Camille Claudel.

The museum is one of the most accessible museums in Paris. It is located near a Metro stop, Varenne, in a central neighborhood, and the entrance fee is very reasonable. The gardens around the museum building contain many of the famous sculptures in natural settings. Behind the museum building are a small lake and casual restaurant.

Additionally, the Metro stop, Varenne, features some of Rodin’s sculptures on the platform. The building is served by Métro (line 13: Varenne or Invalides), RER (line C: Invalides), and bus (69, 82, 87, 92).

Paris Catacombs

The Catacombs of Paris are underground ossuaries in Paris, France, which hold the remains of more than six million people in a small part of a tunnel network built to consolidate Paris’ ancient stone mines. Extending south from the Barrière d’Enfer (“Gate of Hell”) former city gate, this ossuary was created as part of the effort to eliminate the city’s overflowing cemeteries. Preparation work began not long after a 1774 series of gruesome Saint Innocents-cemetery-quarter basement wall collapses added a sense of urgency to the cemetery-eliminating measure, and from 1786, nightly processions of covered wagons transferred remains from most of Paris’ cemeteries to a mine shaft opened near the Rue de la Tombe-Issoire.

The ossuary remained largely forgotten until it became a novelty-place for concerts and other private events in the early 19th century; after further renovations and the construction of accesses around Place Denfert-Rochereau, it was open to public visitation from 1874. Since January 1, 2013, the Catacombs number among the 14 City of Paris Museums managed by Paris Musées. Although the ossuary comprises only a small section of the underground “carrières de Paris” (“quarries of Paris”), Parisians presently often refer to the entire tunnel network as the catacombs.